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Posts Tagged ‘moosehead lake maine’

End of Season Canoe Sale

End of Season Canoe Sale

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Annual Depot Celebration

Annual Depot Celebration

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New Item: Malone Kayak Trailers

New Item: Malone Kayak Trailers

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By Shelagh Talbot

GREENVILLE— More and more people are interested in their family history as evidenced by the many genealogical websites that have popped up in recent years. Folks may not realize it, but right here in Greenville we have our own gem of genealogical information, the organization known as the Moosehead Historical Society and Museums. It was described by William Cook, past President of Maine Archives and Museums as one of the finest small town

Nancy Ayers helps a visitor with some information at the Carriage House on the grounds of the Eveleth-Crafts-Sheridan Museum on Pritham Ave. This service is one of many offered by the Historical Society.
~Talbot photo

museums in Maine, if not all of New England. The Carriage House, where the office is located on the Pritham Ave. campus, holds a treasure trove of archival information about the area as well as the people who lived here.

It all started on a summer evening 50 years ago this July, when a group of dedicated residents thought something should be done to preserve the rich history of this unique part of the world. Activities in those early days focused on collecting ephemera and artifacts of historic interest and finding them an appropriate home. Early meetings were held in the Greenville Town Hall and exhibits were scattered about town at places including the Shaw Public Library, Bangor Savings Bank and the Northeastern Bank.

One of their most popular fundraising events at the time was the Silver Tea celebration, held at the Shaw Public Library and hosted by Mrs. Julia Sheridan, whose beneficence to the society resulted in their acquiring the Eveleth-Crafts-Sheridan house. Businessman John Eveleth built this elegant Victorian home in the early 1890s as a wedding gift to his daughter Rebecca. Rebecca and her husband Arthur loved their home and filled it with the latest in technological advances for the time as well as the finest in furnishings and amenities. Julia Sheridan made it her home also after her parents passed away. When she died, she made provisions in her will that her home be given to the historical society as her lasting memorial. And what a gift it was! At first, a great deal of time was spent on repairs and needed safety-related improvements, but it wasn’t long before the Eveleth-Crafts-Sheridan Historical House was opened on a limited basis for guided tours. When Julia’s husband Phillip died 20 years ago, the Moosehead Historical Society became the benefactor of a trustee-managed investment endowment, which helps to maintain the museum.

Since 1981 the three executive directors, Elliot Levey, Dr. Everett Parker and current Director Candy Canders Russell have worked tirelessly to bring the Moosehead Historical Society and Museums to the point they are now. The most difficult tasks of artifact accessioning, accountability and preservation have allowed for the astounding collection of files in addition to the extraordinary items and artifacts on display.

The Carriage House, with its distinctive cupola, provides people with an ideal place to go for research about families and history of the Moosehead region. A wealth of information about so many subjects is there for your discovery. Perhaps you are looking for information about your own family history in the area. Perhaps you want to know more about Moosehead Lake’s first residents, the Native Americans. Maybe you want to know more about the logging industry and how it shaped Maine as well the United States in the early days. So many of these fascinating tidbits await your discovery at the Carriage House, which is open all year. Volunteers are glad to help you with your questions and offer direction when you are seeking information. There are also numerous books, CDs and videotapes available to enhance your own library. You might also find the perfect gift for someone special at the same time.

The Eveleth-Crafts-Sheridan house is open for tours Wed. through Friday until early October from 1 to 4 p.m. As mentioned earlier, the Carriage House, which also houses the Lumberman’s Museum, is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tues. through Fri. all year. You will also enjoy the Center for Moosehead History at 6 Lakeview St. the Center is open Thurs. – Sunday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and it houses the Aviation Museum as well as an extensive exhibit of Native American artifacts. Visit these museums on line at mooseheadhistory.org or email mooseheadhistory@myfairpoint.net. You may also call them at 207-695-2909.

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Malone Auto Racks is the fastest growing rack accessory company in North America with a track record of over 10 years of industry leadership and innovation. Their products are sold in over 1,500 outdoor online and retail stores located throughout the United States, Canada, Australia and Europe.

Operating from the Coast of Maine has helped them stay true to their mission and our values. Everything they produce must be “Simple to sell – Simple to install – Simple to use”. Their products are built to enhance their customers’ enjoyment of the rivers, lakes and oceans while minimizing your carbon footprint through aerodynamic transport design and complete material recycling through the Malone Recycling Program with

Large display of Malone Carriers in our Sporting Goods Department

EcoMaine. Your transport needs will change over time. If you decide to replace your aging system with the newest and latest Malone innovation, you can send any Malone product back to them for green disposal under the Malone Recycling Program. This process is made possible through a partnership with EcoMaine, a new state of the art recycling facility located here in Maine.

Our staff at Indian Hill Trading Post recognizes the needs of our customers which is why we carry a large selection of Malone Carriers. Contact our Sporting Goods Department today with any questions at 207.695.2104 or stop by. They will be happy to assist you. Also ask about special pricing with the purchase of a new Old Town Kayak or Canoe.

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Mike Moon (NextEra Energy) records information as Tim Obrey, Jeff Bagley, and summer assistant Kody Favreau (IFW) collect date on salmon at the East Outlet Fishway.

The East Outlet of the Kennebec River is a large river with excellent habitat for adult salmon. It is also very good habitat for salmon parr. However, adult salmon need gravel areas for spawning and very young salmon also utilze this type of habitat during their first year in the stream environment.  Early habitat surveys in the East Outlet noted the lack of suitable spawning habitat.  The river is primarily rock and boulder runs and riffles for the entire 2.8 mile section with gravel areas representing less than 1% of the habitat. Flows in the main stem of the river are often too high for young salmon as well. These limiting conditions are reflected in the catch of young wild salmon in the East Outlet fishway trapping during the 1970’s through the mid 1990’s. In that period, the average number of wild salmon less than 12 inches moving upstream from the river into the lake each summer was 325 fish. A river this size could produce thousands of young salmon each year.

In 1998, IFW staff and Kennebec Water Power Inc (operators of the dam on the East Outlet) constructed two side channels in the East Outlet for the purpose of increasing salmon natural reproduction. These channels are off the main stem of the river so flows are lower and more suitable for small young fish. The first channel, which is located immediately downstream of the Beach Pool, provides some excellent spawning habitat.  Another side channel, located about 2 miles downstream of the Rte 15 Bridge, provides very good habitat for salmon fry.

We have continued to trap the fishway periodically since the habitat improvement project in the East Outlet.  Wild salmon production has jumped to an average of nearly 900 young salmon each year.  This year we also had a very good catch of salmon over 12 inches, with approximately 200 wild fish over 17 inches and these adult fish were in remarkable shape. It should be a very good fall fishing season on the river.

This spring we noted that the lower side channel had a considerable amount of rocky material built up at the entrance which was limiting flows during dry periods.  This past week we electrofished the lower side channel with help from NextEra Energy biologists and we found good numbers of young salmon in the section.  NextEra Energy has agreed to conduct some maintenance work on the side channel this summer to make sure it remains functional. We want to thank Mike Moon, NextEra Energy’s operator at the East Outlet Dam, and our summer assistant Kody Favreau for all their help with the fishway this summer.

Submitted by: Tim Obrey – Regional Fisheries Biologist

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READY FOR BUSINESS – The new extension at Muzzy’s Indian Hill Trading Post will be open this weekend. Customers may look forward to generous hand scooped ice cream at a price they won’t be able to resist.

Courtesy Moosehead Messenger June 9, 1982

There are a few changes in store at the Indian Hill Trading Post. Bill Muzzy is not so much extending his store as rearranging it to make it more convenient for his customers.

By next weekend the new extension will be open and people may buy their sandwiches and ice cream directly through the service hatch, rather than standing in line with the grocery and sporting goods customers.

In addition to the sandwiches and scooped ice cream, the Muzzys are opening a soda fountain where lovers of ice cream sodas, splits, sundaes and soft drinks may indulge themselves. The family also plans to serve steamed hot dogs and hot sandwiches.

The extension will be open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and until 8 p.m. on Fridays. During the summer it will possibly remain open until 8 p.m. on the weekends as well.

A novel feature of the new extension is that it will remain open during the winter and not close Labor Day as so many places do. This means that ice cream addicts may still indulge themselves at the soda fountain year round. The hot sandwiches and hot dogs will be available to hunters and snowmobilers passing through town too.

Another addition to the store is the public restrooms. A welcome addition for travelers.

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Celebrate National Rainier Cherry Day at Indian Hill…on sale $3.99 lb.

Rainier cherries are a variety of sweet cherry with a distinct golden yellow color and partial to full red blush. They originated in 1952 after Harold W. Fogel and other researchers from the Washington Agriculture Experiment Station in Prosser, WA crossed the Bing & Van cherry varieties.

Rainier cherries are the sweetest of all cherry varieties, with sugar, or Brix, levels ranging from 17 to 23 percent. They are delicate and have a juice that is second-to-none. In general, Rainier cherries grow a size or two larger than dark-sweet cherry varieties. They are best eaten fresh out-of-hand.

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